Musing and Moving

Friday, two weeks ago, I sat in the middle of my bedroom floor, surrounded by piles of clothing, books, art supplies, cosmetics and documents.  What would I need most during my six months away from Merida? Of course I had a vague idea of what my daily activities would be, and what the weather would be like – but still – nothing felt sure.

Friday, a week ago, Jorge and I visited Mexico City’s Soumaya Museum – a collection of art and culture, created by gifted artists throughout the centuries. Earlier in the week we had seen the Convent of San Jerome – the cloister where Sor Juana Ines dela Cruz wrote some of the most timeless literature of the XVII Century. We also made a trip to the Dolores Olmedo Museum, which houses works by Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo. I felt overwhelmed by so much accomplishment.

This Friday, I have my back propped up against the outside wall of my sister’s cabin at Allison Lake. I can see a path that I know winds and climbs all the way around the lake.

Friday, a week from now – I will be on Pender Island at a knitting retreat – and I don’t even knit!

I seem to spend much of my time musing – about the past, where I am right now, and about the future – maybe I should just let go of all the wondering? Maybe I should get moving?

Time to close up my computer,  lace up my runners – and hit the trail around the lake.

More to come!

Credit: Painting by Chris Sampson

Kamloops

           The view from my bedroom window

Hello Everyone!

I only had time to post once while Jorge and I were in Mexico City, and I hope this first post from Canada finds you well – wherever you are. I’m waking up in Kamloops – it’s not even 5 am, and already fully light outside.

I know I’m going to enjoy this space that my sister and brother-in-law have lent to me. The steep flight of 18 worn, wooden steps up to the apartment brought back memories of Amsterdam! But after Barb and I lugged up my two 50 pound suitcases and several bags of groceries, I realized the climb was not at all difficult.

The dining / living room, a kitchen, two bedrooms and a bathroom (with a claw-foot tub) take up the whole top floor of a 1930s vintage house – so I have quite a bit of space to ramble around. The peaked ceilings and irregularly-shaped rooms are charming. My two tall bedroom windows face north-west, so I have a view that fans over the town’s rooftops, and out towards the sage-colored hills. There is a lot of bird song. The temperature is cool and dry.

I live right in town so I have easy access to the shops, library, and community center.  Just down the hill, there’s a beautiful river path, and a bit later on today, I plan to go for my first walk there.

Writing and painting will be a focus for me over the next few months, and of course, I’ll have lots of sister time with Barb. We will both love this.

My Merida cell phone seems to be working well, and so I am able to talk with everyone back home. Skype, Whatsap and Facetime are other good options for staying in touch.

I must say, I feel a bit like a fish out of water. I have lived in Yucatan for most of my adult life, so this is a huge change. But as my good friend Jose says – We move slowly.

MEXICO CITY

Jorge and I are spending a week in Mexico City prior to my departure for Canada on Saturday. This city is so amazing and over the next few days we plan to visit:

The Cloister of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. This is where La Musa – Mexico’s best known colonial writer lived and wrote her most beloved poems and letters.

The Dolores Olmeda Museum, which houses a superior collection of Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo original paintings.

Cloister de Sor Juana Inès de la Cruz

Xochimilco, the floating gardens of Mexico City – always the setting for a good time

The Soumaya Museum  the museum built by Carlos Slim to honor the memory of his late wife. It showcases their personal art collection.

In the coming days, I will do my best to post a few pictures and anecdotes about our visits…

My Heart is in Two Places

This spring has been unbelievably busy and I’ve not had the chance to do much writing. I hope I can get back to blogging and other projects soon, but BIG changes are in the wings. In fact, until winter rolls around, I won’t be “Writing from Merida” .

I plan on spending the remaining six months of this year in Canada, and if the sun, the moon and the stars all align – winters in Mexico and summers in Canada will become my annual pattern. Some people have told me this shocks them because I have always been a staunch supporter of Mexico.

And I am still a staunch supporter. In 1976 I left Canada to marry Jorge, an amazing man from Yucatan. He taught me about the history, culture and geography of this unique country. We built a home, raised our children and founded a college in Merida. We have a rich, meaningful life here, but as I’ve already said, it is time for “Changes in our Lives”.

I will miss the colors, the music, the food and the flair of Mexico. I will miss my friends, my neighbors, people I know in the markets, and the countryside. Most of all, I will miss my family here.

Not all of them fully agree with my choice. Jorge would prefer I stay here full time, and he doesn’t want to spend half the year in Canada. He will join me there for two months this summer – maybe more as he gets used to the idea?  Our grown children are now building their own lives – they don’t want me to go either, but we will stay in touch by phone, facebook, and whatsap. I have to say though, my eyes fill with tears when I think about not being able to read, play, paint, read, laugh, sing and swim – whenever I want to – with my darling granddaughter, Emma.

I keep reminding myself and others that I’ll be back before we know it. But still, there’s no way to ignore the facts. This is a HUGE change and many wonder why I am making it.

The reasons are complex. I love Jorge, my family, friends and my home – I am truly grateful to have lived four magical decades in Mexico. Nonetheless, full immersion in a country where the language, culture, climate and politics are so different to what I grew up with – has not always been easy. Up until recently, with Jorge’s support and the insights he shares, I have always been able to deal with any challenges that come along. But now we are older, and my priorities are different than when we were young.

When I married Jorge at 24, health care was the furthest thing from my mind. At 64, it is an important consideration. IMSS, the national health care system in Mexico, provides basic coverage but it does not meet all my needs. At my age, I cannot purchase private insurance.

I am fortunate though – even after such a long time away from Canada, I am still a citizen, and therefore eligible for Canada’s health plan. To receive this benefit, I must reside in Canada six months each year. I think the Canadian government is more than fair, and I am  appreciative. I have kept up my relationships with my Canadian family and friends, so I don’t think living there will be hard.

However, as happy as I’ll be to live closer to my loved ones in British Columbia, I know there will be days when I’ll wish I had never left Mexico. As I check items off my to-do-before-departure list, the consequences of my choice weigh heavy.

Yes, change is complicated, and because I am no longer a sweet young thing, I can’t let fear or uncertainty dictate my actions. I have to follow what seems like the best course. I wish Jorge would be flying up to Vancouver with me, but he wants to live in Merida, where he grew up. He is respecting my decision, and I must respect his. Forty years ago, at our marriage ceremony, my aunt read from The Prophet, by Kahil Gibran, and this stanza stuck with me:

“Let there be spaces in your togetherness,

And let the winds of the heavens dance between you.”

This is not the first time Jorge and I have swum against the current – it gets harder as we get older – but we do have a lot of experience. Truth be known, we have been swimming upstream for most of our lives.

So, we’ll see how it goes – this time.

My new blog is (appropriately) called:

CHANGES IN OUR LIVES

https://changesinourlives.wordpress.com

Go to the link, and scroll all the way down to the end of the posts. When you arrive at the footer, you’ll find some general information about me and my writing. You’ll also see the FOLLOW button – click on it if you wish to receive an email alert each time I post.

I look forward to hearing from you.

The heat in Yucatan

Have you noticed that most people have been in a good mood for the past couple of days? A few drivers (one of them behind the wheel of a bus!) actually let me merge into the traffic. The neighborhood dogs have barked less, and all over town, folks are out and about. Obviously, the cooler temperatures have made for a happier Merida.

I started wondering about the scientific studies that measure the effects of extremely hot weather on our physical health and mental wellbeing? Come to find out that tons of them are posted on the internet – and every single one of them starts with a basic assertion:

Worldwide climate instability is caused by global warming. Period.

This means there will be longer, hotter summers in many places, including Yucatan – so heat-related physical and emotional health problems are on the rise.

Earth’s warming oceans and changing climate improve the habitat for mosquitoes. Mosquito bites can infect humans with diseases – both new and re-emerging – like dengue, chikungunya, and west Nile. As the climate continues to heat up there is a real risk that we’ll see more cases of malaria. Ticks also thrive in elevated temperatures, allowing them to feed and grow at a faster rate. The black legged tick is a carrier of Lyme disease.

How can you avoid mosquitoes and other disease transmitters? In Yucatan, you cannot. But you can significantly reduce risks by using insect repellent when you are outdoors, especially in the evenings. Put screens on all your windows and doors, and to prevent propagation, be sure there is no stagnant water in your home or garden. It won’t be pleasant if you are infected – but  don’t panic – follow your doctor’s advice, and you should recover with no lasting side effects.

In the tropics, dealing with the high temperatures is really the biggest challenge. The human body copes with heat by perspiring and breathing. However, if you live in an environment with high temperatures and high humidity, you may be sweating but the sweat won’t be drying on the skin, and this can lead to heat exhaustion. Be alarmed if you feel dizzy, or have a headache. If you begin sweating profusely, your skin turns red, or you have muscle cramps, you can be sure you are being overwhelmed by the heat. These symptoms can usually be quickly treated with rest, a cool environment and hydration (including refueling of electrolytes, which are necessary for muscle and other body functions). Don’t fool around – if you do not deal with this – your condition will move from heat exhaustion to heat stroke.

How can you prevent this from happening? Drinking water – at least 8 glasses a day – in addition to other fluids is essential to good health in Yucatan. The systems in the human body that enable it to adapt to heat cannot cope if dehydration sets in. One more thing – a number of studies show that people taking diuretics for high blood pressure, and beta blockers could be at increased risk.

Fortunately, in Yucatan, the temperature usually falls in the evening, allowing for respite. But on the nights when it remains elevated, the body can get overwhelmed, and you’ll need to be extra careful the following day.  Certainly society has evolved in dealing with the heat—the biggest boon in hot, humid climates is the development of efficient air conditioners. Fans are not enough, and can actually make it harder for the body to adapt to heat. Like a convection oven accelerates cooking time – blowing hot air on a person can heat them up rather than cooling them down. Although some hardy northerners do manage, I would go so far as to say that if you are moving to Yucatan from a cooler climate, you will absolutely need at least one AC unit.

We’re living to older ages, and Yucatan’s climate is nothing to take lightly. Be careful with the I-can-handle-it attitude. Watch how the locals manage the heat and mimic them.

  • Make the daily siesta (at least lie down) part of every day.
  • Only exercise in the early morning or late in the evening.
  • Stay out of the noonday sun.
  • Walk on the shady side of the street.
  • Wear a hat, or carry an umbrella to protect yourself from the direct rays.
  • Use cotton clothing
  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Go easy on the heavy food and alcohol.
  • Do your socializing in the evenings.
  • To bring down your body temperature, take frequent showers or frequently dip into a pool.

Look after yourself, and you’ll live happily in the heat, you’ll save yourself a lot of grief and you’ll be healthier – body, mind and spirit.

 

Have we reached critical mass?

Merida officials at downtown residents’ meeting

Yesterday I attended a meeting convened by Merida’s city administration. The officials present were:

  • Guibaldo Vargas Madrazo: Office of the Mayor
  • IA Mario Arturo Romero Escalante: Chief of Police
  • Mario Arturo KaramEspósitos: Director of Urban Development
  • CP Carolina Cárdenas Sosa: Director of Tourism and Economic Development

A wide cross-section of approximately 80 people showed up – all had an agenda. Private homeowners, assorted business owners, bar and restaurant operators, professionals such as lawyers, an audio engineer, and hotel owners all had their turn speaking. The group included native-born citizens of Merida, Mexican nationals who have moved to Merida from other parts of the country, and foreign residents.

The bar and restaurant owners basically said:

  • We have the right to operate our businesses.
  • We have licenses to stay open late and have live music playing.
  • Bars and restaurants are an important feature of the downtown area.
  • We employ a lot of local people and the lives of our employees matter.
  • It is unfair for the residents of downtown to expect utter silence.
  • It surprised them that only a few native Merida residents were in attendance, and it seemed to them that the complaints are all coming from foreigners.

The homeowners and business people, whether local, national or international:

  • All agreed that bars and restaurants are important to the downtown area.
  • They expressed dubiousness at how the licenses to operate were obtained.
  • All are sympathetic and supportive of the employees – they recognize that everyone needs to work, and they have the right to safe working conditions and salaries that allow them to support themselves and their families.
  • But they want the bars and restaurants to better-manage the noise levels.
  • Many homeowners said they get little sleep because of the noise from the music and revelry.
  • Many business owners said the noise has affected their businesses in a negative way. In fact, several guest houses have closed, or are on the brink of closing, because no one will stay in noisy rooms.
  • Homeowners also object to new bars and restaurants getting permission to operate right beside their already established homes.
  • The homeowners and business owners ask why they have no say in the kind of neighbors they get. They object to having the noisy ones foisted upon them.
  • They say there should be forethought and consultation with all affected parties when a new business opens.

One resident made a very important point. She reminded the Merida authorities that our city enjoys a wonderful reputation as a cultural destination, but if the current situation continues, the international press will learn of it – Merida will get bad publicity – and everyone will lose.

I know I start a lot of posts with, “When I moved to Merida 41 years ago…” but this does give me perspective, and please forgive my repetition of the point. But at the time, the downtown area was a decaying mess – block after block of neglected buildings. Meridanos were moving to the north. As soon as the malls were built, many businesses moved there too.

The renovations and improvements to Merida’s Centro were started 30 years ago, mostly by foreigners who bought the empty, derelict homes. They restored them and once a significant number had been improved, the City and State administrations also began their campaigns, just as the city of Campeche had already done.

The sustained efforts of private homeowners, the city and state governments, laid the groundwork for the beautiful and vibrant downtown area we have today. Then the bars and restaurants started opening (or re-vamped their image)a larger scale.

Now the bars and restaurants say that foreigners are not “respecting local traditions”.  They say that Merida has always had noisy bars and entertainment venues, and this is true. But, but, but– this issue is one of degrees. The sound equipment currently available is much more potent and loud.  The bars and clubs are open late six nights a week. No one would get in a knot over some noise, some of the time. Why don’t the antros behave in a respectful and neighborly way? Why don’t they police themselves?

Now there is even a movement that urges locals to resist the “gentrification” of Merida. That is a broad term. I don’t think improving the aesthetics is gentrification. The antros and clubs charge plenty for their cool hipster atmosphere. That’s gentrification.

Several people at the meeting said that these transgressions happen because bribes to the officials are an accepted modus operandi. The authorities denied this and seemed offended by the allegations.

The authorities asked for our understanding, and gave a lot of excuses as to why they cannot act more forthrightly. They say regulations are not in place. When a resident showed a printout of a federal law pertaining to noise levels, all the officials claimed this law does not apply – that local regulations are necessary.

A lawyer from Merida pointed out that if the laws and statutes do not apply or are outdated and ineffective, they must be changed – the sooner the better.

The lack of native-born Centro residents attending the meeting was mentioned again and again by the bar faction. The person beside me whispered that this was probably because they all knew the meeting would be fruitless and did not want to waste their time.

The discussion got ugly towards the end, and this is when the director of tourism said that there would be another meeting in three months. She promised there would be progress in reviewing the regulation of noise levels.

Everyone dispersed with no sense of consensus. The residents were disappointed with the authorities’ lack of resolve. I think the authorities were surprised that the residents were so vocal and at times, disrespectful. But everyone is angry at the current mess.

To sum it all up, we got the same old run-around as always. All the officials present basically said the same thing:

  • I am sympathetic, but I can do nothing.
  • The appropriate laws are not in place.
  • The guidelines are not current.
  • I cannot act just because I want to.

If you want to contact the city officials who took part in the meeting, here is their contact information:

Lic. Guibaldo Vargas Madrazo:  Office of the Mayor   guibaldo.vargas@merida.gob.mx

IA Mario Arturo Romero Escalante: Chief of Policemario.romero@merida.gob.mx

Ing. Mario Arturo KaramEspósitos: Directo of Urban Developmentaref.karam@merida.gob.mx

CP Carolina Cárdenas Sosa: Director of Tourism and Economic Developmentcarolina.cardenas@merida.gob.mx

If the authorities do not act, we will have an even bigger mess in Merida’s Centro. I do not think it is too late, but I seriously question whether or not the authorities care to change the status quo.

I think this noise issue has reached critical mass.

Consider this

 

Yesterday I wrote about residents’ concerns over the noise level in downtown Merida. From the comments on social media, I conclude that a number of people do not fully understand the situation. Some wrote that the residents who are complaining are “intolerant” and  “un-cool”.

Fine, I guess that everyone has the right to an opinion. But, consider this scenario…

I know a young man (born in Merida) who purchased a derelict carpentry shop on a beautiful lot… 10 meters by 52 meters. It is located in Santa Ana, about 12 blocks northeast of the main square. When he took possession of the property, it was overgrown with 20 years of weeds, piles of rubble, and old shacks; there was no septic tank…  He has spent the past 8 years cleaning, repairing, planting trees and a garden. He built a 2 bedroom home. He is now married and has a child. The young family LOVE their home, especially because so much of their own hard work (and all their money) went into creating it.

Then a huge empty building, right next door to them, was bought by a group of wealthy investors from Mexico City. They are turning this property into a multi-venue eatery, with live music every night. The developers claim it will be a “happening” place… a great “attraction” for Merida.

The young man’s home and the restaurant share a 52 meter common wall. He asked the new owners to somehow soundproof. They said this would be “impossible”… a synonym for “expensive”… The restaurant complex is currently under construction, and jack hammers pound all day. The dust makes it impossible to go outside to the garden or open the windows. The toddler has a cough that won’t go away.

And once the business is up and running, the young family can expect typical restaurant prep noise all day long… kitchen banging, cooks swearing, delivery trucks coming and going, tables being dragged into place… Not to mention the vermin that propagate wherever food is stored.

And at night there will be live music, people whooping it up… it will be IMPOSSIBLE to live in the home they love.

This couple does not have the money to move, and they can’t sell. Who will buy their property with the monstrosity next door? They have been completely SCREWED – OVER.  Sorry, but there is no polite way to put it.

The one hope they have is the meeting to be held today at 4 PM in San Sebastian. The authorities have promised to show up and listen to the residents’ side. The young couple is praying that someone will help them out of this mess.

The residents who are complaining about noise are not just “whining expats”. They are also Meridanos whose families have lived in El Centro for generations, and they are not asking for anything outlandish. They are not “intolerant and un-cool”. They are people who have rights and they need to be heard. We should show them respect and support… not dismiss them.

Because think about this… if proper zoning and noise ordinances are not enforced, anyone’s home could be the next to be invaded. I don’t think anyone would like that.

Protecting Merida’s Quality of Life

                                                Is this what you want going on next door to your home?

Merida is a wonderful place to live… just look at the statistics documenting the numbers of people moving here from other states in Mexico and from other countries .

So many settle here for the “quality of life”-

However, the “quality” is at risk for homeowners in Merida’s “Centro” (the downtown area). There are now so many restaurants, bars and night clubs, and the noise levels are out-of-control. Rules and regulations that “manage” these businesses do exist, but obviously there is a lot of “oversight”…

I know one resident of the Santiago area who had to close her guest house because the racket coming from two bars, nearly every night of the week, made it impossible for her guests to sleep.

Someone very dear to me is watching in horror, as what seems to be a giant eatery, is being set up right beside him on Calle 47. The young family’s home shares a common wall with this place, and the owners (investors from Mexico City) refuse to reveal their full intensions. Jack hammers are pounding all day and into the evening, so I think there is A LOT going on. And I ask, who is “gaining” from this invasion of a homeowners’ rights?

The neighbors who established their homes long before “the investors” moved in have every right to see their property respected, but they are led around the mulberry bush  time and time again.

Finally a meeting has been scheduled to address these issues with the:

  • Chief of police
  • Director of Urban Development
  • Officials of the Ministry of the Interior and Justice
  • Director of Tourism

If you are concerned (and we all should be) please come to the meeting:

Friday March 24, 2017

4 PM

In front of the Church of San Sebasistian, Calle 75 # 549 X 72 and 70)

If you have any evidence to support your complaints (decibel readings, video, photos, testimonials, or documentation of your interaction with the business owners or authorities) please bring them to the meeting.

VERY IMPORTANT: If you are worried that your participation will be construed as a political act (which is forbidden for foreigners) please get that idea out of your head. This is not solely a “foreigners’ protest”. It is action led by this city’s local residents who wish to conserve the very way of life that makes their city so attractive to themselves and other people. They are sick and tired of unrelenting, mismanaged “progress” that destroys their tranquility, just so “the investors” can make more money.

My husband and I will be at this meeting, we hope you will join us.

The eyes have it…

“I am sure many people compliment you on your eyes,” I said to a woman I met last week.

“Just as they must comment on yours,” she replied.

Between two international residents, such an exchange would sound strange, but my new acquaintance is not from the United States, Canada or a European country.

Her brightly embroidered huipil, friendly smile, and physical features type-cast her as a Yucatecan village woman, and indeed, she comes from Muna, close to Uxmal. But while most of the country’s population is dark-eyed – this lady has  striking blue eyes.

We did not have a long conversation, but I figured her family tree probably includes a few of the Casa Carlota settlers.

Casa Carlota was established during the Second Mexican Empire (1864-1867) when two Yucatecan hamlets – Santa Elena and Pustunich – received 443 German immigrants. They were farmers and artisans who came to the country at the invitation of Mexico’s Emperor Maximilian, brother of the Austrian king Franz Joseph. The emperor hoped to colonize the Yucatan with 600 European families a year.

Funding for the project did not last long because Emperor Maximilian met an early demise by firing squad. The German settlers dispersed. Some went to other Mexican cities, some to the USA, others back to Europe, and of course some stayed on.

These individuals and families quickly formed relationships with the people living in the surrounding countryside. Marriages were performed,  and many German-Maya children arrived into the world.

Readers interested in learning more about this unique period of local history can download and read this PDF containing information compiled by Alma Duran-Merk:

http://www.academia.edu/2140174/Identifying_Villa_Carlota_German_Settlements_in_Yucat%C3%A1n_M%C3%A9xico_During_the_Second_Empire_1864-1867_._3rd._edition_electronic_version

 

Changes

Jorge and Joanna 1976

The only constant is change. Over the years, I’ve quoted this apparent oxymoron over and over again. In fact, the first paragraph of Magic Made in Mexico – my book for international residents in Mexico – emphasizes this very point:

I’ve often wondered what would happen if we could recognize pivotal times in our personal journeys – the forks in the road that present themselves – do we see them coming? Does a vague premonition warn us that certain decisions are destined to truly change our path? If we could anticipate those critical junctions, would we have the nerve to follow through?

I certainly did “follow through” – but for the past several years, I have sensed more than a “vague premonition” – I’ve known that changes are not far off. In fact the Universe  has been banging me over the head with a cast iron frying pan. Yet, I have resisted. I’ve tried to divert my thoughts and actions.

Part of me doesn’t want to make any changes. For a whole gamut of reasons, I want to continue ambling along just as I’ve done up until now. And yet, another part of me feels like a diver poised with her toes curled around the no-slip tip of the highest platform – waiting for the whistle to shrill – the signal that it’s her turn to leap.

Forty-one years ago I moved to Merida. I was young – incredibly young. I did not comprehend how radically different my new world would be, but at twenty-three, I thrived on adventure. I craved it like chocolate. Now, I am almost triple that age. The life I charged into has been amazing, enriching,   challenging, and wonderful – mostly because Lady Luck introduced me to Jorge – the man who has shared the roller coaster ride. Now retired, I guess we should be settling into our dotage, resting on our laurels – taking it easy.

But gale force winds are blowing again – I feel the need to regroup, refocus and repurpose my life.

For a mishmash of practical, sensible, prudent reasons, and for some emotional, familial, climate-related, and age-induced ones – I’ve decided to move back to Canada for the “warmer” half of each year.  I will continue to live in Merida for the “cooler” half.

Those readers who know me will immediately wonder – what does “the man who has shared the roller coaster ride” have to say about all this? To be honest, Jorge is less than thrilled. This is my doing, but he is willing to give it a go. After all, if we don’t adjust, we can always change our minds and pick up where we left off. Potential for un-change is also limitless, isn’t it?

Jorge and I will probably not be able to leave Merida until June, which means we’ll be away until December.  We plan to settle in Kamloops, a city of approximately 90,000 people in the interior of British Columbia. The place has much to offer– lots of sunshine, a small university, cultural venues, and a good library located two blocks from our 2 bedroom apartment. There are paths along the river for pleasant walks, and lakes for swimming – cold swimming. The shopping is plentiful – in both farmers’ markets and malls. Local wineries and pick-your-own-veggie fields will make for some vastly-different-from-Yucatan day trips. But the best feature in Kamloops is the close proximity to my sister, Barb, and other family and friends.

And to mark this milestone, what does an earnest blogger do? Why, she starts a new blog, what else? After nearly a decade, it feels bitter-sweet to be leaving Writing From Merida. But it’s all about change, right?

After today, I do not plan on writing any new posts for Writing from Merida. From now on, you will find all my new content and some of the posts from my former blog at:

 Changes in our Lives

https://changesinourlives.wordpress.com/

If you wish to follow the new blog, you need to re-subscribe – scroll to the very bottom and click on the button provided.

Changes in our Lives is still a work in progress. Be patient – it will continue to evolve – as will Jorge and I.

Jorge and Joanna 2017